Faulkner’s Epigraph to Mosquitoes

I am not as erudite or as descriptively verbose, but this is uncontestable:

In spring, the sweet young spring, decked out with little green, braceleted with the song of idiotic birds, spurious and sweet and tawdry as a shopgirl in her cheap finery, like an idiot with money and no taste; they were little and young and trusting, you could kill them sometimes. But now, as August like a langourous replete bird winged slowly through the pale summer toward the moon of decay and death, they were bigger, vicious; ubiquitous as undertakers, cunning as pawnbrokers, confident and unavoidable as politicians. They came cityward lustful as country boys, as passionately integral as a collage football squad; pervading and monstrous but without majesty: a biblical plague seen through the wrong end of a binocular: the majesty of Fate become contemptuous through ubiquity and sheer repetition.

Mosquitoes was recently reissued by Liveright Publishing

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About Uri Brito

I am the Pastor of Providence Church (CREC) in Pensacola, Fl.
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