Category Archives: Christmas

The Benefits of Lectionary Preaching

When I arrived at my local congregation in Pensacola we were using the Revised Common Lectionary. The RCL is a fine Lectionary and provides a wonderful tour of the Scriptures in a three year cycle. But as time went on … Continue reading

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Lent, Ligon Duncan, and Legalism

Collin Hansen wrote an article for the Gospel Coalition entitled Should You Cancel Good Friday? which has brought to the attention of many a conversation they have never had before. What is Lent? Why celebrate it? As a committed Protestant, I am committed to … Continue reading

Posted in Ascension, Augustine, Christendom, Christian Liberty, Christian Living, Christmas, Church Calendar, Debate, Dominion, Ecclesiology, Education, Eschatology, Ethics, Exhortation, Exodus, Gospel, Hospitality, Humility, John Calvin, Journal, Justice, Lectionary Readings, Lent, Resurrection, Typology/Symbolism/Biblical Parallels | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Exhortation: And So This is Still Christmas…

Merry Christmas! After all Christmas is with us until January 6th, which is Epiphany. The calendar is moving. Our final candle is lit. Christ has come! But he did not come the way it was expected by men; He came … Continue reading

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Book Review: Bill Bennett’s “The True Saint Nicholas: Why He Matters to Christmas”

There are too many unknown facts, as Bill Bennett rightly asserts. Much of the historical data is purely speculative with the exception of a few references, poems and prayers in honor of Saint Nicholas. The Roman Catholic tradition has largely … Continue reading

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Epiphany Re-Gathering

The Epiphany season is a babelic reversal. It does not contain the fullness of the Pentecost reversal, but it is the beginning of this undoing. Babel was meant to be a flood-proof structure and empire. Jesus opens the flood gates, … Continue reading

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Christmas Sermon: The Marriage of Heaven and Earth

Sermon: People of God, merry Christmas! On this joyful day Christians celebrate the birth of our Lord. We celebrate the humanity of Christ, and we celebrate our humanity. To be human is not to shelter an insignificant body, but a … Continue reading

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Is Celebrating Christmas UnReformed?

Mark Horne does a superb job in this piece, which is well worth a few minutes: ‘Tis the season to be informed–sometimes in gentleness, often with vigor–by a variety of Christians claiming that it is wrong to celebrate Christmas. I … Continue reading

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Are You Going to Church on Christmas?

My good friend, Steve Wilkins, has already written a few insightful thoughts on the subject. It is not hard to find churches all over the country cancelling Christmas Sunday. In many ways this is a theological travesty. The celebration of Christmas … Continue reading

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The Incarnation: Gospel, Deception, and Justice

The audio from my first sermon after Christmas. Manuscript: Prayer: May the words of my mouth, and the meditations of our hearts be acceptable in Your sight, O Lord, our Rock, and our Kinsman. Amen. Sermon: People of God, this … Continue reading

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First Day of Christmas

1 TIMOTHY 1:15-17 15This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief. 16However, for this reason I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ … Continue reading

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